Influence: The Importance of Making an Impact

Influence

Some people think influence is reserved only for the extremely rich or powerful – the types of people who run governments or large organizations or become the face of a national cause. But the truth is, each and every person wields significant influence in their lives, from family and teams to organizations and community. These are you primary circles of influence.

Effect vs. Impact

As a leader in those circles, you have the opportunity to positively or negatively influence the trajectory of those around you, whether family, friends, co-workers, or members of your community. 

Since influence is power, we all have a great responsibility to utilize our influence for the best interest of those in our lives, so let’s start unpacking this responsibility by first understanding two key words:

  • Effect – to affect someone is to do something that changes the way they think, work, or live.
  • Impact – to impact someone is to mark them indelibly or otherwise alter their trajectory due to a deep, core-level influence. 

For instance, we are affected by a thunderstorm due to electrical surges or temporary power outages, causing inconvenience, discomfort, and possibly changing the way we react to storms in the future. But we are impacted forever if that thunderstorm produces a tornado that destroys homes, property, and lives on a deeper level.

Aim for Impact

Similarly, every one of us affects each other in our lives on a daily basis, sometimes for better and sometimes for worse.

But very few people truly make an impact on others.

People who merely affect us can be forgotten, as their influence is passing and impermanent. People who impact us, however, are memorable and significant to our personal growth.

Therefore, we can choose to:

• Positively affect those around us through random (and intentional) acts of kindness OR
• Negatively affect those around us through annoying behavior.

That means we can decide to…

• Positively impact others by going above and beyond what they expect OR
• Negatively impact others by domineering behavior.

As leaders, let’s choose to not only make a positive effect, but to raise the game and invest our efforts in making a lasting impact that ripples beyond the surface. Let’s be intentional about altering the trajectory of others in a positive way for their long term benefit.

To be memorable is to carve out the gift of a good legacy and it all starts with a choice… a conscious choice that each of us needs to make.

This was originally posted by GiANT Worldwide and I wanted to share it here as well. If you’re interested in learning more about how to make an impact vs. an effect, I’m happy to schedule a meeting to discuss. Just click the contact button and let me know!


Source: GiANT

Accidental vs. Intentional Leadership

The Leader We Should Strive to Become 

This post is a follow up to a previous article titled “One Quality Every Great Leader Shares.” In it we discussed what it means to become a “leader worth following.” We call such leaders “Liberating Leaders,” and defined their unique qualifications as being someone who knows when to bring an appropriate level of support (encouragement, training, resources, etc.), but also when to call their people up to a higher level of work or conduct (accountability, standards, deadlines, etc.).

Note: You can hear more about this in a recent podcast episode we recorded. Click here to listen on iTunes – Episode #001. Click here to read more.

The best leaders, those who create a culture of empowerment and healthy growth, are the leaders who learn how to calibrate an appropriate degree of both support and challenge. As a result, we introduced a tool called the “Support-Challenge Matrix” that helps plot leader tendencies along the support and challenge axes in order to understand the (im)balance of these elements and highlight the kinds of cultures they create.

Accidental vs. Intentional Leadership

But in order to become a Liberator, leaders need to be intentional about their own growth by adopting a lifelong pursuit of self-awareness. Many people are familiar with the term “self-awareness,” along with the myriad number of books written about the concept, but fewer people understand the importance of accidental versus intentional leadership in cultivating that self-awareness.

Accidental leadership is when we go about our lives merely reacting to the situations that confront us in the moment. It’s characterized by a lack of vision and intentional forethought around the person or leader we want to become. As a result, we have no plan for how to deal with life and leadership challenges, which results in an ever-shifting moral and leadership compass with no consistent direction or path to get where we want to go.

Therefore, the journey toward Liberating Leadership begins with intentionality. It’s rooted in a willingness to look in the mirror, or even let others hold up a mirror for you, in order to see what it’s like to be on the other side of you. What is it like to be led by you? Loved by you? What tendencies do you have that build others up or bring them down, and are those tendencies increasing or decreasing your influence with them?

Intentionality: The Path to Liberating Leadership

This sort of self-honesty is a challenge for everyone. It requires being secure in who you are, but also the humility to commit to a process of uncovering your weaknesses in order to become the best person and leader you can be in all areas of your life. Unfortunately, tendencies don’t really change, but with intentionality, humility, and effort, we can begin to have a choice between our default patterns of how we normally respond to a situation, and what we want our actions to be.

The best leaders are intentional about this process and invite others to help them see where they can improve – to hold up of a mirror of sorts. Our best description of the leaders who commit to this challenge is that they are humble, hungry, and smart. Humble enough to admit, “I really want to grow,” and invite others to help me; hungry because they decided, “I really don’t want to stay the way I am,” and smart enough to be able to learn and commit to that learning and growth over a period of time.

Intentionality Leads to Consistency

Intentional leadership is not for the faint of heart. After all, accidental leadership is the definition of default mode. It’s easy, it’s reactionary, and it doesn’t require facing our weaknesses or embracing our learning opportunities. And it certainly doesn’t require inviting others to challenge us in that process.

The truth is, most leadership fails because the leader is inconsistent, and in that regard, accidental leadership can never be the answer. It succumbs too easily to the whims of self-preservation and knee-jerk reactions. Another word for consistent, however, is intentional.

So if you remember nothing else, remember this: Intentionality leads to consistency.

When you become consistent, you become healthy, as both a leader and a person. And when you become healthy, your influence grows dramatically. Then, guess what happens: You start winning. Your team starts winning. You actually start feeling at peace with yourself. With that security comes confidence and humility, which makes people begin to respect you even more.

That’s what it means to be a liberator.

This was originally posted by GiANT Worldwide and I wanted to share it here as well. If you’re interested in learning more about how intentionality affects your leadership, I’m happy to schedule a meeting to discuss. Just click the contact button and let me know!


Source: GiANT

4 Questions to Understand How Your People Learn and Grow

Healthy team growth begins with knowledge, self-awareness, camaraderie, and shared values. 

Once you begin to truly know your teammates – what drives their lifestyle and priorities, what affects them inside and outside the office, what they value – you will start to feel a natural interest in the things that help them grow as leaders and people. 

Understanding how your colleagues and employees learn is one of the most important aspects of fostering that growth. By nurturing their unique learning process, you will help your people change and improve communication, reach their full potential, and foster better teamwork for greater effectiveness and efficiency.

Below are a series of questions to kick-start some intentional reflection about how you can help your co-workers, employees, and teammates grow. If you put in the effort, these questions will identify how you can best contribute to their growth while making you a more effective leader and teammate on their journey to greater personal and professional development.

How do they learn? 

Does your teammate learn by speaking, reading, listening, or experiencing/doing? This is crucial. Everyone processes knowledge differently, and those who insist on people “learning it the right way” will ultimately stunt their employees’ growth and potential. But if you invest in helping your people figure out how they become their best, you’ll gain their respect and dedication because they’ll know you are “for them.” 

When do they learn best? 

Some people need time to process and may learn best through reading and extended analysis, which requires the time and space to do it. Others need to be able to speak their mind, brainstorm, and try out their grasp of the knowledge by learning in the midst of teams or groups. Give your people the grace to learn when and how they need to, then watch them thrive.

What do they need to learn? 

We all need to learn new things every day. No one will ever know enough to justify the cost of becoming complacent with knowledge. What do your teammates or employees need to learn? Are they focusing too much on their strengths, when they need to become more well-rounded or knowledgeable in other areas of your business? Or maybe they think they know more than they do, and could benefit from the wisdom of experience and how to read various situations? Whatever it is, never stop considering where your people are in their expertise and which knowledge gaps have persisted, grown, or recently formed. If you stay on top their growth trajectory, then you can work to close those gaps by leveraging when and how they learn best. 

Are they teachable? 

This is perhaps the most important question of all. We know that no one is perfect and everyone has room for improvement, so teachability is crucial to constantly raising your potential and contributing to the team. It also indicates humility and an ability to get along with and learn from others, particularly those who think, act, speak, or have different experiences than they do. Since we all need to learn something the question to each of us is this – are we teachable? To be teachable is to be willing to take advice and to change or improve the areas that need to grow. Consequently, a teachable spirit is one of the most vital strengths we have – it’s how we continue to become the best versions of ourselves each and every day. 

Choose to be “for others”

When you help someone learn, you help them grow.  Choosing to contribute to someone else’s growth pays dividends of joy, health, and productivity for all those involved. 

So take some time this week to be “for others” and consider how you can help them become the best version of themselves – I promise you won’t regret it!

This was originally posted by GiANT Worldwide and I wanted to share it here as well. If you’re interested in learning more about how you can better understand the way your teammates learn and grow, I’m happy to schedule a meeting to discuss. Just click the contact button and let me know!


Source: GiANT

How do You Process Information?

Sensing and Intuition

If you’re just joining us, we recently concluded a six-part series on how to determine the first of your four Jungian Type personality preferences. The series took a deep dive into the true meaning of Extraversion (E) vs. Introversion (I), discussing what it means for the way you recharge and communicate, as well as how your natural wiring influences the way you lead and interact with others. You can catch up with us by checking out that series , or you can continue reading and jump right in as we begin a new series tackling the second Jungian Type preference set. I would, however, suggest taking a moment to read the introductory post about Jungian Type and the GiANT Best Fit in general, so that you can dive into the conversation with some background and helpful terminology warnings. 

Interestingly, the second preference is typically the hardest for people to clarify. This set of letters, “S” vs. “N,” addresses how you prefer to take in and process information. While the differences between the two can be tricky to spot, the letter choice often proves confusing at the beginning. “S” stands for “Sensing,” so no issue there, but “N” actually stands for “Intuition.”That sometimes throws people off since the word doesn’t start with an “n.” However, because we already have introversion represented by an “I” in the first preference pairing, we have to represent intuition with a different letter, “N.” 

The Great Cry of the Sensor

If you are a right-handed sensor (i.e. have a dominant preference for “sensor”), it means you prefer to take in and process information in a precise, exact, detailed manner. Most sensors want to be able to use their five senses to analyze whatever quantitative information they can get their hands on. Is it concrete? Is it real? Can I touch it, taste it, see it, hear it, smell it, analyze it? The more real, pragmatic, and concrete the information, the more confident the sensor is in their ability to understand and make decisions. The great cry of the sensor, above all else, begs for someone to “Tell me what is!” They don’t want conjecture, ideation, hunches, or guesses. They want hard facts, data, and history to factor into their decisions. Sensors are always thinking, “Okay, let’s make sure we really understand where we are and what the unvarnished realities of the situation are at the moment.”

The Great Cry of the Intuitive

Intuitives, on the other hand, start at the completely opposite end of the world. Instead, they tend to ask for the big picture first, begging someone, “Sell me a vision, and if I’m inspired by the vision of what could be, I’ll work my way back towards the details.”  In stark contrast to sensors, and much to every sensor’s horror, Intuitives will rarely bother with the details of a decision, idea, or situation until they are absolutely certain that they’re really excited about it. Their great cry is, “Tell me what could be!” Consequently, most intuitives will often rely heavily on, and justify their decisions with, what they love to call their “sixth sense” or “gut feeling,” especially when it comes to making big decisions. Nothing could be more terrifying for sensors. 

So What?

Now that we know Sensors and Intuitives tend to process information through fundamentally opposing methods, that leaves a great deal of room to explore the pitfalls and struggles of each. These differences become especially glaring in light of the various ways intuitives and sensors approach details, planning, and change, as well as how they view the past, present, and future. Join us for the next installment in this series as we discuss the common pitfalls that plague each of the information/processing preferences!

This was originally posted by GiANT Worldwide and I wanted to share it here as well. If you’re interested in learning more about how your personality affects your leadership, I’m happy to schedule a meeting to discuss. Just click the contact button and let me know!


Source: GiANT

What are You Trying to Prove?

Have you ever run into an old acquaintance and felt the need to prove yourself? 

Maybe the last time you saw each other was in high school and they’ve moved on to some high-flying career. Or maybe you’re experiencing a rut in your own work and just feel the need to impress someone. 

The Urge to Prove

Regardless of circumstance, most of us have felt the need to prove ourselves to someone at some point in our lives. GiANT Co-founder, Jeremie Kubicek, shares his own story about a recent encounter that left him feeling anxious to prove himself:

“Over the past few weeks, I have run into a number of old relationships who knew me in another stage of life and another decade. They knew the more immature me and probably have me pegged as that same cocky guy who was trying to prove that he was somebody important.

As one particular encounter unfolded, I listened to this person list off all of their achievements since we had last met. When the person asked what I had been up to, I immediately felt an old desire to prove to this person any successes and wins that I had had since the time I had known them. I didn’t like the feeling of such a sudden, defensive urge, so I paused and shared some general updates about my family and then moved on.”

So here is the gut-check question: where does the instinctive desire to prove ourselves come from? Why is it so important to let others know how important we are?

Self-Preservation

Many of us who study personality wiring can probably pinpoint a few triggers deep within our personality types that cause such a knee-jerk reaction to validate ourselves. For Jeremie, he realized some of his natural insecurities as an ENFP were the culprits. Consequently, he had to confront the defensive pride that welled up so that it would not prompt actions or words he would later regret.

Now, what about you? What are you trying to prove? What is the insecurity in your life that is mitigating your influence with others?

In his book Making Your Leadership Come Alive, Jeremie wrote about the plague of self-preservation. The premise is that when you overprotect what you are afraid of losing, you will lose it sooner. Trying to prove yourself actually ends up hurting you more, because when fear begins to drive, your actions to prove your worth end up undermining your credibility in the eyes of others. It leads to bragging, exaggerating, or credit-stealing behavior, not to mention a general tone-deafness that results in being known as self-important or arrogant. 

Nothing to Prove, Nothing to Hide, Nothing Lose!

It is imperative to become fluent in self-awareness so that you can regulate and lead yourself in the times when self-preservation wants to guide your behavior.

In the end, if we can state these phrases honestly and accurately in our lives, we will become leaders worth following:

I have nothing to Prove!

I have nothing to Lose!

I have nothing to Hide!

How far away are you from being at this stage of secure, confident humility?

We all have an ongoing journey of self-awareness to travel, but if we approach each day with a desire to regulate our patterns so that our insecurities can’t control us, we will gain an increasingly greater ability to focus on others more than ourselves.

Dive Deeper!

If you want to dive deeper into understanding why you do certain things or face certain growth challenges, our other Co-founder, Steve Cockram, has filmed a series of amazing videos at https://giant.courses that are free to view and study for your own benefit.

Know yourself so you can lead yourself!

This was originally posted by GiANT Worldwide and I wanted to share it here as well. If you’re interested in learning more about how self-preservation affects leadership, I’m happy to schedule a meeting to discuss. Just click the contact button and let me know!


Source: GiANT

3 Ways to Re-Engage Half-Hearted Employees

Do you have wholehearted people in your life? 

Who do you know that is fully in or completely devoted to something? They’re the type of people who, as Thoreau once put it, “suck out all the marrow of life.” They live with passion and purpose. When they dive into something, they attack it with every bit of experience, intelligence, and dedication they have. They don’t shy away from relationships or challenges, but take them head-on and work to make the most out of them.

Make a list of those people you consider to be wholehearted. Who comes to mind?

Now, who do you know that is half-hearted? Are there people you work with who are not fully “in” or devoted to the team/organization? They tend to be those who feel like they always have one foot out – out of the relationship, the work, the team, etc.

Make a second list of those you consider to be half-hearted.

Learning Opportunities for Half-hearted People

Now it’s time to drill down to the heart of the issue: what makes the difference between wholehearted vs. half-hearted people? For those in your organization, how much of this attitude depends on them and how much do you believe depends on you as a leader or organization to cultivate?

When people are only giving half-hearted efforts, they cause direct and indirect damage to those around them, whether family, colleagues, or organizations. Their primary need is to find a way to take responsibility and re-engage with the people, world, and obligations around them. 

Unfortunately, the reason for this hesitance can derive from many places, whether it be getting burned in the past, being overburdened in other areas of life, or because they avoid giving too much of their trust and commitment to others. The following are 4 ways in which half-hearted people can learn to re-engage:

4 Areas of Accountability for the Half-Hearted

  1. Many half-hearted people need to learn to trust people more since withholding trust often indicates an untrustworthy nature yourself.
  2. In some cases they need to forgive previous leaders in past experiences before they can move forward in their present reality.
  3. Half-hearted people also usually need improvement in communication. Their tendency is to have high expectations, but not tell anyone about them because they are not invested enough to do so. However, this disconnect only causes bitterness and distance.
  4. Half-hearted people need to learn to lead themselves well. This requires being honest about faults and strengths and then applying personal accountability to spur greater investment of time and effort that will result in stronger connections with others. 

Every person harbors a different reason for being half-hearted in their pursuits and relationships, so the changes or drivers that will get them back on track may change from person to person. However, the list above provides a greater starting point for re-asserting the type of personal discipline that will spark much needed re-engagement with the life around them.

Responsibilities of the Wholehearted

It’s not just up to the half-hearted hangers-on, though. Aside from the fact that many of us – even those who seem fully invested in everything we do – will go through similar phases of life in which certain areas may receive less than our full attention; we always have a responsibility to help half-hearted people become engaged. Here are a few tips to help re-engage those co-workers, employees, or family members who seem to be checked out:

3 Ways You Can Help Re-Engage the Half-Hearted

  1. Bust through the veneer. Get inside the mind and heart and talk to the potential missed expectations or fears that keep them holding back their best effort.
  2. Lean forward, not backward. Half-hearted people have a tendency to become victims. They expect people to move away and then blame them for issues. Do the opposite. Encourage accountability and provide them with the support they need to take you up on it. Either way, you will either get them in the game or they will leave.
  3. Create an environment or atmosphere where people must be whole-hearted or the team will correct them rather than you (if you’re the leader). A whole-hearted culture won’t put up with veneer or a façade, and it’ll make the gradual slip into disengagement much harder to continue unnoticed.

The role of the leader is to create an overall cultural atmosphere that invites people to go deep and to be who they are meant to be. So lean in, set the tone with your example. Go deeper and press for a wholehearted culture. It is so much better than a shallow, half-hearted drama factory.

This was originally posted by GiANT Worldwide and I wanted to share it here as well. If you’re interested in learning more about how half-hearted cultures affect your organization, I’m happy to schedule a meeting to discuss. Just click the contact button and let me know!


Source: GiANT

3 Ways to Re-Energize Half-Hearted Employees

Do you have wholehearted people in your life? 

Who do you know that is fully in or completely devoted to something? They’re the type of people who, as Thoreau once put it, “suck out all the marrow of life.” They live with passion and purpose. When they dive into something, they attack it with every bit of experience, intelligence, and dedication they have. They don’t shy away from relationships or challenges, but take them head-on and work to make the most out of them.

Make a list of those people you consider to be wholehearted. Who comes to mind?

Now, who do you know that is half-hearted? Are there people you work with who are not fully “in” or devoted to the team/organization? They tend to be those who feel like they always have one foot out – out of the relationship, the work, the team, etc.

Make a second list of those you consider to be half-hearted.

Learning Opportunities for Half-hearted People

Now it’s time to drill down to the heart of the issue: what makes the difference between wholehearted vs. half-hearted people? For those in your organization, how much of this attitude depends on them and how much do you believe depends on you as a leader or organization to cultivate?

When people are only giving half-hearted efforts, they cause direct and indirect damage to those around them, whether family, colleagues, or organizations. Their primary need is to find a way to take responsibility and re-engage with the people, world, and obligations around them. 

Unfortunately, the reason for this hesitance can derive from many places, whether it be getting burned in the past, being overburdened in other areas of life, or because they avoid giving too much of their trust and commitment to others. The following are 4 ways in which half-hearted people can learn to re-engage:

4 Areas of Accountability for the Half-Hearted

  1. Many half-hearted people need to learn to trust people more since withholding trust often indicates an untrustworthy nature yourself.
  2. In some cases they need to forgive previous leaders in past experiences before they can move forward in their present reality.
  3. Half-hearted people also usually need improvement in communication. Their tendency is to have high expectations, but not tell anyone about them because they are not invested enough to do so. However, this disconnect only causes bitterness and distance.
  4. Half-hearted people need to learn to lead themselves well. This requires being honest about faults and strengths and then applying personal accountability to spur greater investment of time and effort that will result in stronger connections with others. 

Every person harbors a different reason for being half-hearted in their pursuits and relationships, so the changes or drivers that will get them back on track may change from person to person. However, the list above provides a greater starting point for re-asserting the type of personal discipline that will spark much needed re-engagement with the life around them.

Responsibilities of the Wholehearted

It’s not just up to the half-hearted hangers-on, though. Aside from the fact that many of us – even those who seem fully invested in everything we do – will go through phases of life in which certain areas may receive less than our full attention, we also have a responsibility with half-hearted people to help them become engaged. Here are a few tips to help re-engage those co-workers, employees, or family members who seem to be checked out:

3 Ways You Can Help Re-Engage the Half-Hearted

  1. Bust through the veneer. Get inside the mind and heart and talk to the potential missed expectations or fears that keep them holding back their best effort.
  2. Lean forward, not backward. Half-hearted people have a tendency to become victims. They expect people to move away and then blame them for issues. Do the opposite. Encourage accountability and provide them with the support they need to take you up on it. Either way, you will either get them in the game or they will leave.
  3. Create an environment or atmosphere where people must be whole-hearted or the team will correct them rather than you (if you’re the leader). A whole-hearted culture won’t put up with veneer or a façade, and it’ll make the gradually slip into disengagement much harder to go without noticing.

The role of the leader is to create an overall atmosphere in the culture that invites people to go deep and to be who they are meant to be. Lean in, set the tone with your example. Go deeper and press for a whole-hearted culture. It is so much better than a shallow, half-hearted drama factory.

This was originally posted by GiANT Worldwide and I wanted to share it here as well. If you’re interested in learning more about how half-hearted cultures affect your organization, I’m happy to schedule a meeting to discuss. Just click the contact button and let me know!


Source: GiANT

One Quality Every Great Leader Shares

Leadership.

It’s a term you hear all the time. People talk about good leaders and bad leaders, incompetent leaders and absent leaders, but how often do we dive into the specifics of what it means to be a good leader?

Not often. Leadership is a common topic, but its core competencies are rarely identified or defined.

Note: We discussed Liberating Leadership in a recent podcast episode. To listen to it on iTunes, click here and subscribe to stay up to date. Or, you can read more here.

Leaders Worth Following

Here at GiANT Worldwide, we strive to help people all over the world become what we like to call “leaders worth following.” The key distinction here is the idea of leaders “worth” following versus leaders people “have to” follow.

If we use the “have to follow” criteria, then there are plenty of leaders out there. Anyone with a title and a taskmaster attitude can technically be called a leader. But we believe leaders can be more than that. Moreover, we believe true leaders should be more than that. We believe they should be worth following because others want to – because they inspire, encourage, and challenge others to become the best versions of themselves.

So, what does it look like to be a leader worth following?

The Liberating Leader

It’s easiest to explain with a tool called the “Support-Challenge Matrix.” The Support-Challenge Matrix works on the idea that the best leaders are those who calibrate a healthy level of both support and challenge for their team. We call these people “Liberating Leaders,” or “Liberators.” This means the leader knows when to bring an appropriate level of support – encouragement, training, resources, etc. – but also when to call their people up to a higher level of work or conduct. This “challenge” entails bringing accountability, standards, deadlines, and when appropriate, reprimand, to the table. The resulting environment is a culture of empowerment where people are challenged to be the best they can be, while also receiving the opportunity to be stretched beyond their comfort zone for the sake of personal and professional growth.

Leaders who intentionally cultivate such an environment are fighting for the highest possible good in the lives of all those they lead.

That is the holy grail. Our ambition is to be those people in every circle of influence, whether that’s with our family, our friends, our teams, our organizations, or even our leadership roles in the wider community.

The Journey Ahead

But leadership is an on-going, day-to-day journey. Sometimes we exhibit liberator tendencies at work, whereas other days we may act more like a dominator in the wider organization, a protector with our team, or an abdicator at home.

We will dive deeper into the Support-Challenge Matrix in later posts to uncover what it means to lean towards Dominator, Abdicator, and Protector tendencies, but for now, we wanted to introduce you to the idea of the Liberating Leader.

If we had to sum it up in two sentences:

Ultimately, the Liberating Leader is someone who cultivates an intentional process of self-awareness and personal growth, while applying their knowledge to fight for the highest possible good in the lives of all those they lead. This means effectively calibrating high support and high challenge for everyone in their circles of influence, including self, family, team, organization, and community.

The path to becoming a liberator is difficult, but it is also incredibly rewarding. We look forward to walking with you on that journey as we delve deeper into the core principles of leadership in the coming weeks and months.

This was originally posted by GiANT Worldwide and I wanted to share it here as well. If you’re interested in learning more about how The Support-Challenge Matrix can help you become more of a Liberating Leader, I’m happy to schedule a meeting to discuss. Just click the contact button and let me know!

Source: GiANT

Leadership Tips & Insights for Extroverts and Introverts

This is the final post in a series about Extroverts and Introverts. If you haven’t read the previous posts, make sure you go back and do so.

Hopefully by now you are getting a clearer grasp of what it means to be an Introvert or an Extrovert and which one might be your natural tendency. Some of you reading may still be on the fence, and that’s okay. We recommend “trying on” each preference for a while and seeing which feels most natural.

But understanding yourself is one thing. Leveraging that knowledge to lead yourself in making better choices and becoming the best person, spouse, and leader you can be is quite another.

That’s why we’ve drawn up a few leadership insights for each of the preferences. They are intended as guidelines, suggestions for growth, and guardrails that Extroverts and Introverts alike will find helpful in applying to their daily life. Whether you’re an Extrovert and want to know yourself better, or you’re an Introvert who wants to understand the other half of the world that doesn’t think or recharge the same way, these insights will help you apply this knowledge to the relationships and challenges in your everyday world.

Leadership Insights: Extroverts

1. Learn to be fully present and truly listen to the opinions of Introverts before attempting to respond. 

Most Extroverts never give the Introvert a chance to share their whole sentence before they jump in and try to finish it for them. So an important learning opportunity is to work on how to listen and stay present in listening.

2. Watch how much you talk for in any conversation.

Finishing an Introvert’s sentence never goes down well! Plus, it’s easy for an Extrovert’s enthusiasm for conversation to dominate an Introverts more reserved attempts to get a word in.

3. Beware of the Boomerang Effect

A lot of Extroverts will often, consciously or subconsciously, try to bring whatever anyone else is saying back around to being about them. Try to detect it in your conversations. Next time you’re talking, listen to yourself and see if you find yourself falling into consistent patterns of saying “that reminds me about me.” This isn’t by nature a bad thing, it’s often an Extroverts way of trying to engage with what’s being said. But too much of this can come off as arrogant while also serving to silence the Introverts.

4. Silence is Okay, the Introverts have heard you!

A big challenge for you as an Extrovert will be learning to believe and trust that silence is okay. We promise, the Introverts have definitely heard you. Don’t assume because there’s silence that somebody is ignoring you or hasn’t heard you. Many Extroverts will repeat the question more slowly assuming the Introvert hasn’t understood since they haven’t managed to respond immediately to what the Extrovert said. But sometimes people need time to think and want to do so before giving their opinion.

5. Don’t stack your questions, give time for a considered reply.

Don’t stack your questions, Extroverts! It’s a guarantee that every Introvert has been bombarded with “Well, what about this? What about that?” You have to give your Introverts a chance to answer the question you asked before moving on to a follow-up question.

6. Learn to appreciate Introverts, you don’t see what they’re best at.

Because Introverts by nature are not as cavalier with their ideas, skills, and knowledge, Extroverts often overlook what they are best at. The truth is we often overestimate the capability of Extroverts because they readily show you what they love most and what they’re best at. But we almost always underestimate the capacity of Introverts because they tend to keep what they’re best at for the internal world.

7. Create opportunities that allow your Introverts to use their right hand.

Because they keep what they’re best at for their internal world, and rarely feel compelled to volunteer their opinions and skills before ready, then do your best to create opportunities that allow them to use their dominant preference. This might include giving them time to go away and think about their response to a question or task instead of demanding one on the spot.

Extrovert Leadership Challenge

If you are an Extrovert, we encourage you to choose two of the leadership insights listed above as your most pressing learning opportunities. Write them down. Think about them. And make a plan for how you can begin to apply them to the reality of your life and leadership challenges.

If you are an Introvert by preference, hopefully you’re getting an insight into the complex world of those who struggle with tendencies opposite your own.

Leadership Insights: Introverts

  1. Over communicate with your team! It may be real and loud inside your head but that doesn’t mean others have truly heard it.
  2. Learn to share your ideas out loud even if they are not perfect.
  3. Learn to project your enthusiasm and energy into the external world. Body language and tone of voice communicate more than words.
  4. To really hear what an Extrovert thinks you will have to let them speak for longer than you would wish!
  5. Don’t judge an Extrovert for thinking out loud; help them learn discretion and discipline.
  6. Take time each day to recharge your battery, it will actually increase your productivity.
  7. Giving yourself constantly to others will eventually diminish your capacity to help them.

Introverts need time to recharge. If you just keep giving to people, you eventually run out of energy for them.

Introvert Leadership Challenge

If you are an Introvert, I encourage you to choose two of the leadership insights listed above as your most pressing learning opportunities. Write them down. Think about them. And make a plan for how you can begin to apply them to the reality of your life and leadership challenges.

If you are an Extrovert by preference, hopefully you’re getting an insight into the complex world of those who struggle with tendencies opposite your own.

Wrapping up Introvert vs. Extrovert

And that’s a wrap for Part I of our Leadership & the Power of Self-Awareness series. We hope you’ve enjoyed learning about the inner workings of Introverts and Extroverts and are better equipped to understand both yourself and others on a deeper level.

We would love for you to continue your leadership journey with us as we dive into our next segment on how different types understand and process information. Part II of this series will cover Sensing vs. Intuition – delving into the strengths, weaknesses, and key markers of each tendency as well as how to figure out which one might be your natural preference. And as always, we’ll give you some key leadership takeaways to help you apply what you’ve learned to your everyday life and leadership challenges.

This was originally posted by GiANT Worldwide and I wanted to share it here as well. If you’re interested in learning more about how your personality affects your leadership, I’m happy to schedule a meeting to discuss. Just click the contact button and let me know!


Source: GiANT

2018 GiANT Guide to the New Year

“Before you lead others – you must first lead yourself.”

We all have the potential to raise our leadership capacity. Being a leader doesn’t just happen at work, but it happens in every circle of influence: ourselves, our families, our teams, our organizations, and our communities. At GiANT, we work tirelessly to help people become leaders others want to follow. We also believe the best leaders are those who know how to effectively provide support and challenge to their people while fighting for their highest possible good. We are on a mission to raise up liberating leaders all around the world.

Here’s our gift to you as you begin this new year.

Click Here to Download the Guide »


Source: GiANT

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